Netflix Users: Don’t Get Hooked by This Tricky Phishing Email

If you own a smart TV, or even just a computer, it’s likely you have a Netflix account. The streaming service is huge these days – even taking home awards for its owned content. So, it’s only natural cybercriminals are attempting to leverage the service’s popularity for their own gain. In fact, just discovered last week, fake Netflix emails have been circulating claiming there are issues with users’ accounts. But of course, there is no issue at all – only a phishing scam underway.

The headline in itself should be the first indicator of fraud, as it reads “Update your payment information!” The body of the fake email then claims that there’s an issue with a user’s account or that their account has been suspended. The email states that they need to update their account details in order to resolve the problem, but the link actually leads victims to a genuine-looking Netflix website designed to steal usernames and passwords, as well as payment details. If the victim updates their financial information, they are actually taken to the real Netflix home page, which gives this trick a sense of legitimacy.

In short – this phishing email scheme is convincing and tricky. That means it’s crucial all Netflix users take proactive steps now to protect themselves this stealthy attack. To do just that, follow these tips:

  • Be careful what you click on. Be sure to only click on emails that you are sure came from a trusted source. If you don’t know the sender, or the email’s content doesn’t seem familiar, remain wary and avoid interacting with the message.
  • Go directly to the source. It’s a good security rule of thumb: when an email comes through requesting personal info, always go directly to the company’s website to be sure you’re working with the real deal. You should be able to check their account status on the Netflix website, and determine the legitimacy of the request from there. If there’s still anything in question, feel free to call their support line and check about the notice that way as well.
  • Place a fraud alert. If you know your financial data has been compromised by this attack, be sure to place a fraud alert on your credit so that any new or recent requests undergo scrutiny. It’s important to note that this also entitles you to extra copies of your credit report so you can check for anything sketchy. And if you find an account you did not open, make sure you report it to the police or Federal Trade Commission, as well as the creditor involved so you can put an end to the fraudulent account.

And, of course, to stay on top of the latest consumer and mobile security threats, be sure to follow me and @McAfee_Home on Twitter, listen to our podcast Hackable? and ‘Like’ us on Facebook.

Leave a Comment

10 − five =