The GPS Rollover Bug: 3 Tips to Help You Avoid Phishing Scams

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Today, users are extremely reliant on our GPS devices. In fact, we’re so reliant on these devices that map features are programmed into almost every IoT device we use as well as inside of our vehicles. However, the Department of Homeland Security has issued an alert to make users aware of a GPS receiver issue called the GPS Week Number Rollover that is expected to occur on or around April 6, 2019. While this bug is only expected to affect a small number of older GPS devices, users who are impacted could face troubling results.

You may be wondering, what will cause this rollover issue? GPS systems count weeks using a ten-bit parameter, meaning that they start counting at week zero and then reset when they hit week 1,024, or 19.5 years. Because the last reset took place on August 21, 1999, it appears that the next reset will occur on April 6, 2019. This could result in devices resetting their dates and potentially corrupting navigation data, which would throw off location estimates. That means your GPS device could misrepresent your location drastically, as each nanosecond the clock is out translates into a foot of location error.

So, how does this rollover issue translate into a potential cyberthreat? It turns out that the main fix for this problem is to ensure that your GPS device’s software is up-to-date. However, due to the media attention that this bug is receiving, it’s not far-fetched to speculate that cybercriminals will leverage the issue to target users with phishing attacks. These attacks could come in the form of email notifications referencing the rollover notice and suggesting that users install a fraudulent software patch to fix the issue. The emails could contain a malicious payload that leaves the victim with a nasty malware on their device.

While it’s difficult to speculate how exactly cybercriminals will use various events to prey on innocent users, it’s important to be aware of potential threats to help protect your data and safeguard your devices. Check out the following tips to help you spot potential phishing attacks:

  • Validate the email address is from a recognized sender. Always check the validity of signature lines, including the information on the sender’s name, address, and telephone number. If you receive an email from an address that you don’t recognize, it’s best to just delete the email entirely.
  • Hover over links to see and verify the URL. If someone sends you a link to “update your software,” hover over the link without actually clicking on it. This will allow you to see a link preview. If the URL looks suspicious, don’t interact with it and delete the email altogether.
  • Be cautious of emails asking you to take action. If you receive a message asking you to update your software, don’t click on anything within the message. Instead, go straight to your software provider’s website. This will prevent you from downloading malicious content from phishing links.

And, as always, to stay on top of the latest consumer and mobile security threats, be sure to follow @McAfee_Home on Twitter, listen to our podcast Hackable? and ‘Like’ us on Facebook.

Categories: Consumer Threat Notices
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