Apple Users: Here’s What to Do About the Major FaceTime Bug

By on

FaceTime is a popular way for people of all ages to connect with long-distance loved ones. The feature permits Apple users to video chat with other device owners from essentially anywhere at any time. And now, a bug in the software takes that connection a step further – as it permits users calling via FaceTime to hear the audio coming from the recipient’s phone, even before they’ve accepted or denied the call.

Let’s start with how the eavesdropping bug actually works. First, a user would have to start a FaceTime video call with an iPhone contact and while the call is dialing, they must swipe up from the bottom of the screen and tap “Add Person.” Then, they can add their own phone number to the “Add Person” screen. From there, the user can start a group FaceTime call between themselves and the original person dialed, even if that person hasn’t accepted the call. What’s more – if the user presses the volume up or down, the victim’s front-face camera is exposed too.

This bug acts as a reminder that these days your smartphone is just as data rich as your computer. So, as we adopt new technology into our everyday lives, we all must consider how these emerging technology trends could create security risks if we don’t take steps to protect our data.

Therefore, it’s crucial all iOS users that are running iOS 12.1 or later take the right steps now to protect their device and their data. If you’re an Apple user affected by this bug, be sure to follow these helpful security steps:

  • Update, update, update. Speaking of fixes – patches for bugs are included in software updates that come from the provider. Therefore, make sure you always update your device as soon as one is available. Apple has already confirmed that a fix is underway as we speak.
  • Be sure to disable FaceTime in iOS settings now. Until this bug is fixed, it is best to just disable the feature entirely to be sure no one is listening in on you. When a fix does emerge from Apple, you can look into enabling the service again.
  • Apply additional security to your phone. Though the bug will hopefully be patched within the next software update, it doesn’t hurt to always cover your device with an extra layer of security. To protect your phone from any additional mobile threats coming its way, be sure to use a security solution such as McAfee Mobile Security.

And, of course, to stay on top of the latest consumer and mobile security threats, be sure to follow @McAfee_Home on Twitter, listen to our podcast Hackable? and ‘Like’ us on Facebook.

Categories: Consumer Threat Notices
Tags: , ,

Leave a Comment

Similar articles

For as long as you’ve had a phone, you’ve probably experienced in one form or another a robocall. These days it seems like they are only becoming more prevalent too. In fact, it was recently reported that robocall scams surged to 85 million globally, up 325% from 2017. While these scams vary by country, the ...
Read Blog
As the companies we trust with our data become more digital, it’s important for users to realize how this affects their own cybersecurity. Take your medical care provider, for instance. You walk into a doctor’s office and fill out a form on a clipboard. This information is then transferred to a computer where a patient ...
Read Blog
Messaging apps are a common form of digital communication these days, with Facebook’s WhatsApp being one of the most popular options out there. The communication platform boasts over 1.5 billion users – who now need to immediately update the app due to a new security threat. In fact, WhatsApp just announced a recently discovered security ...
Read Blog